Office Address

Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery,

Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi Bunkyo-ku,

Tokyo 113-8603, Japan

Phone: +81-3-5814-6208

Fax: +81-3-5685-3076

E-mail: r.ogawa@nms.ac.jp / r.ogawa@mac.com


Clinical Research Interests

Perforator Flap Surgery / Reconstructive Microsurgery

Burn Reconstructive and Regenerative Surgery

Keloids and Hypertrophic Scar Treatment / Scar Management

Scar-less Wound Healing

Benign / Malignant Skin Tumor Treatment


Basic Research Interests

Cellular Mechanics / Mechanobiology

Scar Biology

Cartilage Tissue Engineering

Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ASCs)

Skin Flap Physiology / Vascular Anatomy of Thin Flaps


Editorial Board of Scientific Journals (selective)】

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - Global Open

ePlasty

Plastic Surgery International

OA Plastic Surgery

Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy

Recent Patents on Regenerative Medicine

SCAR Journal

Journal of Japan Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery(Japanese)

Scar Management (Japanese)

Wound (Japanese)


Reviewer of Scientific Journals (selective)

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery

Annals of Plastic Surgery

Wound Repair and Regeneration

Journal of Investigative Dermatology

Burns

Tissue Engineering


【Board / Faculty of Medical Society (selective)】

Japanese Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (JSPRS)

Japanese Society for Wound Healing (JSWH)

Scar Club

Japan Scar Workshop (JSW)

International Scar Meeting in Tokyo (ISMT)

Asian Scar Forum in Shanghai (ASFS)

Tokyo Meeting on Perforator and Propeller Flap (TMPPF)


【Membership of Medical Society (selective)】

American College of Surgeons (ACS): Fellow of ACS

American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS): International Member of ASPS

International Confederation for Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery (IPRAS)

Wound Healing Society (WHS)

Plastic Surgery Research Council (PSRC)

Orthopedic Research Society (ORS)

International Federation of Adipose Therapeutics and Science (IFATS)

World Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM)

Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS)

Japanese Society for Regenerative Medicine (JSRM)

Japanese Society for Burn Injuries (JSBI)

Japan Association of Aesthetic Medical Incorporated (JAAM)

■Clinical Research Interests


Perforator Flap Surgery / Reconstructive Microsurgery

Perforator flaps have been developed for the purpose of reducing donor site morbidity and harvesting thin skin flaps. Perforator flap surgery needs highly precise microsurgical technique to identify, isolate, and anastomose small diameter vessels under microscope. These flaps are employed for reconstructing soft tissue defects caused by injury such as trauma and burn, tumor resection and congenital deformities in both functionally and aesthetically. I have studied how to harvest thin, large and reliable flap with perforators under safer procedures. Especially, I have studied extremely thin flaps namely “Super-thin flaps” with Professor Hiko Hyakusoku in our facility. It is primarily thinned to the layer where the subdermal vascular network (subdermal plexus) can be seen through the minimal fat layer. Moreover, much longer and larger flaps can be harvested according to the selection of the perforators attached to the flaps as “perforator-supercharged Super-thin flaps."

<Anterior neck reconstruction using "Super-thin flap" with perforators>

(Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Color Doppler Ultrasonography in the Planning of Microvascular Augmented Super-thin [SVN: subdermal vascular network] Flaps. Plast Reconstr Surg 112: 822-828, 2003.)


Burn Reconstructive and Regenerative Surgery

After severe burn injury, scars are developed in the course of wound healing. Scars often become not only aesthetic but also have functional problems. Once scar contractures are developed, scar contractures on the joint regulate smooth joint movement and results in growth impairment of tissues especially in the case of children. Thus, it is important to decide what treatment should be selected and how to prevent scar contractures in acute stage. In case of scar contractures, it will be important how to release contractures and how to cover the defects. I have studied the algorisms of consecutive burn treatments, classification of scar contractures and methods of scar contracture releasing. Moreover, I have tried to use tissue-engineered biomaterials for tissue regeneration as regenerative burn surgery.

<Burn scar resurfacing using autologous skin grafts>

Autologous skin grafts were harvested from inguinal region and transplanted ater removal of scars.

(Ogawa R, Akaishi S, Kinoshita K. Treatments of Post-Burn Hypertrophic Scars. Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery, Springer, IN PRESS.)


Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars Treatment / Scar Management

Keloids and hypertrophic scars are considered to be a pathologically benign fibroproliferative disorders (FPD) of skin. Thus, they do not result in death. However, patients with keloids and hypertrophic scars feel irritable pain and itching, as well as a stretching sensation. Moreover, cosmetic issues, such as the ugly shape, pigmentation and depigmentation often occur. I have considered them to be a serious source of mental pain, equivalent to that experienced by patients with malignant diseases. Only patients may be able to understand this distinction in its fullest sense. With respect to keloids, many of them undergo uncontrolled growth and can become quite large. For this reason, it is particularly important to treat keloids in young patients because of the danger of permanent disfigurement later on. Unfortunately, this is quite often overlooked by physicians who think that keloids as just a cosmetic problem. Thus, I have tried to perform aggressive treatments, including surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. Nowadays, many non-surgical treatments and adjuvant therapies with surgery have developed. I am trying to establish the evidence-based algorithms of treatment keloids and hypertrophic scars with international specialists of “Scar Club”.

<Multimodal thrapy of keloids using surgery, silicone gel sheets and post-operative radiation>

Small/single keloids can be treated radically by surgery with adjuvant therapy, which includes radiation or corticosteroid injection, or by nonsurgical monotherapy, which includes corticosteroid injection, cryotherapy, laser, and anti-tumor/immunosuppressive agents (e.g. 5-fluorouracil [5-FU]). However, large/multiple keloids are difficult to treat radically; thus, symptomatic multimodal therapy are currently available.

(Ogawa R, Mitsuhashi K, Hyakusoku H, Miyashita T. Postoperative Electron-Beam Irradiation Therapy for Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars. Retrospective Study of 147 Cases Followed for More Than 18 Months. Plast Reconstr Surg 111: 547-553, 2003.)


Scar-less Wound Healing

Wound healing process is composed of four phases that include coagulation, inflammatory, proliferating and remodeling. In the coagulation phase, platelets make clots in the wound immediately after injury, and these platelets start to release and activate cytokines. It is suggested that these signals result in the recruitment of inflammatory blood cells, circulating fibroblasts (fibrocytes) and various kinds of stem cells in the inflammatory phase. After that, tissue repair starts by prolifereation of epithelial cells, fibroblasts and other tissue resident cells. In this phase, there is a possibility that abnormal scarring such as hypertrophic scars occur caused by abnormal inflammatory response of fibroblasts. Thus, I have studied how to control and regulate the excessive inflammation, and how to accelerate wound healing to prevent outstanding scars using cells, agents, biomaterials, and devices.

<Multimodal thrapy for trauma using surgery, corticosteroid ointment and taping fixation>


Benign and Malignant Skin Tumor Treatment

Reconstruction via skin grafting is a basic surgical technique that is used to reconstruct the tissue defects that occur after tumor extirpation, that is also useful for early detection of local recurrence. The most ideal approach after tumor extirpation is to directly suture the wound margins together. However, this can only be performed if the wound is not too big and the adjacent skin can be extended sufficiently. Recent developments in reconstructive techniques, including thin flap-based techniques, and wound coverage materials mean that we can now choose from a wide and rapidly evolving variety of primary and aesthetic secondary reconstruction methods.

<Multimodal thrapy for congenital nevus using skin grafting, ointment and taping fixation>


■Basic Research Interests


Cellular Mechanics / Mechanobiology

The effect of mechanical force on cells and tissues has been studied widely in the field of biomechanics and tissue engineering. For example, it is well known that the endothelial cells in the lumen of vessels are constantly affected by shear stress and hydrostatic pressure generated by the blood flow. These cells, along with vascular smooth muscle cells, are also affected by tension generated by the stretching of the vessel wall. It has been suggested these mechanical forces regulate endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and cytokine secretion and regulate vascular diameter. Moreover, it is well known that the chondrocytes in articular cartilage are always affected by shear stress and hydrostatic pressure and these mechanical forces regulate chondrocyte differentiation and maturation and tissue formation.


Thus, I have studied mechanoreceptors on cells and mechanosensitive nociceptors in tissues, and I have tried to use mechanical force for wound healing, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

<Fibroblasts those were cultured in 3-D gel with mechanical forces>


Scar Biology

The mechanisms of scar formation and generation of fibroproliferative diseases (FPD) of the skin including keloids and hypertrophic scars are not completely understood due to the lack of ideal animal models. As mechanical stress appears to be an important role, we are studying mechanotransduction factors in scar formation and FPD generation. We have proposed that mechanical stress increases neuropeptides in the skin, causing neurogenic inflammation. The resulting abnormal collagen production may evoke keloid and hypertrophic scar formation. Moreover, I have thought that FPD of skin in particular may results from mechanoreceptor or mechanosensitive nocicepter disorder.

<Analysis of stretching tension around keloids>

Our studies suggest that stretching tension is an important condition associated with growth of abnormal scars including keloids and hypertrophic scars.

(Akaishi S, Akimoto M, Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. The relationship between keloid growth pattern and stretching tension: visual analysis using the finite element method. Ann Plast Surg 60: 445-451, 2008.)


Cartilage Tissue Engineering

Cartilage is an avascular tissue found in articular surfaces, the tracheobrobcial tree, ribs, eyelids, ears and the nasal skeleton. Tissue engineered three-dimensional (3-D) chondrocyte constructs can be used potentially to repair or replace damaged cartilage. It has been widely recognized that chondrocytes, particularly those in articular cartilage, develop and are maintained physiologically by mechanical forces, including hydrostatic pressure and shear stress. These mechanical forces may regulate chondrocyte differentiation, maturation, and tissue formation. For purposes of cartilage tissue engineering, such microenvironmental factors, including mechanical forces, are necessary to develop and maintain cartilage in vitro. Thus, I have focused on 3-D cartilage formation using stem cells.

<Stem cells cultured in a 3-D collagen scaffolds>

Our results demonstrated stem cells differentiation into chondrocytes in a 3-D collagen scaffolds with treatment of a cyclic hydrostatic pressure. Cyclic HP is effective in enhancing accumulation of extracellular matrix and expression of genes indicative of chondroid differentiation.

(Ogawa R, Mizuno S, Murphy GF, Orgill DP. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on 3-D Chondroinduction of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells. Tissue Eng Part A. 2009, IN PRESS.)


Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ASCs)

Adipose tissue represents an alternative source of adult stem cells that may also be harvested from bone-marrow, skin and skeletal muscles. Subcutaneous adipose depots are accessible, abundant, and replenishable. Moreover, adipose-tissue is routinely discarded after cosmetic surgical procedures such as liposuction, providing a fertile opportunity for adipose-tissue banking. We have previously reported the extraordinary plasticity inherent in murine ASCs with respect to their ability to undergo chondrogenic, osteogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic differentiation of mouse ASCs in vitro. We have also demonstrated in vivo adipose tissue regeneration using mouse ASCs and in vivo periodontal tissue regeneration using rat ASCs.

<Adipose-derived stem cells those were differentiated into chondrocytes>

ASCs were prepared from inguinal fat pads of GFP transgenic mice. After the primary culture in growth medium (DMEM + 10% FBS + 1%ABAM), the cells were incubated in chondrogenic medium (DMEM + 1% FBS + 1%ABAM + insulin + ascorbate2-phosphate + TGF-beta1). Chondrogenic differentiation was confirmed by Alcian blue staining, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.

(Ogawa R, Mizuno H, Watanabe A, Migita M, Shimada T, Hyakusoku H. Osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation by adipose-derived stem cells harvested from GFP transgenic mice. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 313: 871-877, 2004.)


Skin Flap Physiology / Vascular Anatomy of Thin Flaps

Our focus on flap thinning techniques has allowed us to harvest extremely thin but large flaps including “Super-thin flaps”, which we use primarily to reconstruct large areas such as the face and neck. A discriminating feature of the flap is that it is extremely thin. However, the physiology of these thin flaps is not completely understood. I have analyzed blood flow, pressure of oxygen, metabolism and gene expression on the thin flaps to understand the mechanisms of flap survival and to develop flaps that will be much more useful clinically.

<Perforator vessels in a thin flap>


■Papers in Scientific Journals on PubMed

 Search for Rei Ogawa's articles on PubMed


■Papers in Scientific Journals (English: not listed in PubMed)

 Papers


■Papers in Scientific Journals (Japanese)

 Papers


■Papers in Scientific Journals (Chinese) 

 Papers


■Papers in Scientific Journals (Japanese Translation) 

 Papers


■Editing of Scientific Journals

【English Journals】

Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy -Special Issue 0001-. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells. Edited by Ogawa R, Bentham Science Publishers, U.A.E., 2010.

 

Journal of Wound Technology Issue 15. Scar. Edited by Ogawa R, Editions MF, Paris, 2012.


Europian Surgery Vol 44 -Main Topic: Scars and Keloids-Edited by Ogawa R, Koch H, Springer, Germany, 2012.

 

【Japanese Journals】

PEPARS No.33. Current Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars. Edited by Ogawa R, Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, 2009.


■Editing of Scientific Publications

【English Publications】

Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery. Edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, 2010.


【Japanese Publications】

http://www.zenniti.com/mokuji/books/kizu.html 

Atlas - Methods for Scarless Wound Healing. Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, 2006.

 

Atlas - Methods for Scarless Wound Healing 2nd Edition. Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, 2012.


■Chapters in Scientific Publications

【English Publications】

Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. The Subdermal Vascular Network Flap - The concept of the “Super-thin Flap”, “Perforator Flaps” edited by Drs. Blondeel, Hallock, Morris and Neligan: Quality Medical Publishing, Inc. St Louis, pp1002-1027, 2006.


Ogawa R, Fujimura J, Mizuno H, Hyakusoku H, Shimada T. Tissue Engineering Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Harvested From GFP Transgenic Animals, “New Developments in Stem Cell Research” edited by Grier EV: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp149-172, 2007.


Ogawa R, Fujimura J, Mizuno H, Hyakusoku H, Shimada T. Tissue Engineering Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Harvested From GFP Transgenic Animals, “DNA Reaserach Trends” edited by Young MP: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp101-124, 2007.


Fujimura J, Ogawa R. Pharmacological Interventions and Regenerative Medicine for Neuromuscular Diseases,“Tissue Engineering Research Trends” edited by Greco GN and Ferreri ML: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp87-114, 2008.


Fujimura J, Ogawa R. Perspectives in Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (ASC's) Research, “Research Progress in Stem Cells” edited by Greco TJ and Ferreri ML: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp65-78, 2008.


Ogawa R, Orgill DP. Mechanobiology of Cutaneous Wound Healing and Scarring, "Bioenginering Research of Chronic Wounds" edited by Amit G: Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, pp31-42, 2010.


Ogawa R. Keloid. "Decision Making in Plastic Surgery" edited by Marsh JL, Perlyn CA: Quality Medical Publishing, Inc. St Louis, pp24-25, 2010.


1. Ogawa R, Pribaz JJ. Diagnosis, Assessment, and Classification of Scar Contractures. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp44-61, 2010.

2. Ogawa R, Akaishi S, Kinoshita K. Treatments for Post-Burn Hypertrophic Scars. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp76-81, 2010.

3. Takami Y, Ono S, Ogawa R. Acellular Allogenic Dermal Matrix. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp100-107, 2010.

4. Murakami M, Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Tips for Skin Grafting. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp146-157, 2010.

5. Ogawa R, Ono S, Hyakusoku H. Superficial Cervical Artery Perforator (SCAP) Flap. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp344-355, 2010.

6. Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Mizuno H. Super-Thin Flap. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp356-367, 2010.

7. Mateev MA, Ogawa R. Shape-Modified Radial Artery Perforator (SM-RAP) Flap for Burned Hand Reconstruction. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp416-427, 2010.

8. Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Perforator Supercharged Super-thin Flap. "Atlas of Burn Reconstructive Surgery" edited by Hyakusoku H, Orgill DP, Teot L, Pribaz JJ, Ogawa R. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg, pp452-461, 2010.


Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. External Wire Frame Fixation for Skin Grafts. "Skin Grafts - Indications, Applications and Current Research" edited by Spear M. InTech - Open Access Publisher, Croatia, pp299-306, 2011.

 

Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. External Wire Frame Fixation for Skin Grafts. "Skin Grafts - Indications, Applications and Current Research" edited by Spear M. InTech - Open Access Publisher, Croatia, Chapter 21, 2011.

 

Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. The Burn Reconstructive Units on the Face and Neck. "Burns: Prevention, Causes and Treatment" edited by McLaughlin ES, Paterson AO: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp143-154, 2012.

 

Ogawa R. 30. Benign and Malignant Nonmelanocytic Tumors of The Skin and Soft Tissue. "Plastic Surgery Third Edition -Pronciples-"edited by Neligan PC: Elsevier, New York, pp707-742, 2012.


Helm DL, Orgill BD, Ogawa R, Orgill DP. Burn Dressings and Skin Substitutes. "Biomaterials Science 3rd Edition" edited by Rantner BD, Hoffman AS, Schoen FJ, Lemons JE: Academic Press, New York, pp 1006-1010, 2012.

 

1. Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Definition and Nomenclature of Propeller Flaps, “Perforator Flaps 2nd edition” edited by Drs. Blondeel, Hallock, Morris and Neligan: Quality Medical Publishing, Inc. St Louis, pp1305-1316, 2012.

2. Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. The Superthin Flap - The concept of the Subdermal Vascular Network Flap, “Perforator Flaps 2nd edition” edited by Drs. Blondeel, Hallock, Morris and Neligan: Quality Medical Publishing, Inc. St Louis, pp1329-1360, 2012.

 

Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Useful Tips for Skin Grafts. "Skin Grafts" - edited by Gore M. InTech - Open Access Publisher, Croatia, Chapter 6, 2013.

 

1. Ogawa R. Chapter 6: Prevention of Scars. "Scars and Scarring" edited by Lee Y: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp109-120, 2013.

2. Ogawa R. Chapter 7: Radiation Therapy for Scars. "Scars and Scarring" edited by Lee Y: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp123-130, 2013.

3. Ogawa R. Chapter 8: Surgical Therapy for Scars. "Scars and Scarring" edited by Lee Y: Nova Science Publishers, New York, pp131-138, 2013.

 

【German Publications】

Rennekampff HO, Ogawa R. II-11.2 Klassifilation und Nomenklatur von Perforatorlappen und mikrovaskular augmentierter Lappen, “Plastische Chirurgie” edited by Krupp S, Rennekampff HO, Pallua N: Ecomed-Medizin, Landsberg, pp1-6, 2008.


【Japanese Publications】

http://www.zenniti.com/mokuji/books/kizu.html 

1. Ogawa R. Classification of Wounds, Atlas - Methods for Scarless Wound Healing. edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp1-11, 2006.

2. Ogawa R. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar, Atlas - Methods for Scarless Wound Healing. edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp1-11, 2006.


Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Injury of Lower Limb and Foot: Avulsion Injury / Crush Injury, Plastic Surgery for Trauma. Edited by Yasuse M, Sugamata A, Kokuseido Shuppan, Tokyo, pp203-205, 2007.


1. Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Ono S. Occipito-Cervico (OC) and Cervico-Pectral (CP) Super-Thin Flaps, Actual Flap Surgery and Microsurgery. edited by Hyakusoku H, Ichinose M and Hosaka Y. Bunkodo, Tokyo, pp38-41, 2010.

2. Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Mentum and Anterior Neck Reconstruction, Actual Flap Surgery and Microsurgery. edited by Hyakusoku H, Ichinose M and Hosaka Y. Bunkodo, Tokyo, pp196-199, 2010.

3. Ogawa R, Akaishi S, Hyakusoku H. Thin Flap and Its Perforator Supercharging, Actual Flap Surgery and Microsurgery. edited by Hyakusoku H, Ichinose M and Hosaka Y. Bunkodo, Tokyo, pp272-274, 2010.


1. Ono S, Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Occipito-Cervico (OC) Flap, Useful Flap Methods-from Indication to Elevation-Part 1. edited by Nakajima T, Hyakusoku H. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp95-100, 2010.

2. Ogawa R, Vu Quang Vinh. Supraclavicular Flap-Anterior Neck Reconstruction-, Useful Flap Methods-from Indication to Elevation-Part 1. edited by Nakajima T, Hyakusoku H. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp107-110, 2010.


Ogawa R, Ono S, Hyakusoku H. Perforator-Supercharged Super-Thin Flaps, Useful Flap Methods-from Indication to Elevation-Part 2. edited by Nakajima T, Hyakusoku H. Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp106-110, 2010.


Ogawa R, Bayer LR, Orgill DP. Chest Wall Intractable Ulcer, Practice Manual of The Negative Pressure Wound Therapy -V.A.C.ATS(R) System-. edited by Harii K, Ichioka S, Oura N. Kokuseido Shuppan, Tokyo, pp73-76, 2011.


1. Ogawa R. Choice Method of External Preparation, Wound Dressing and Devices for Wounds. Atlas -Plastic Surgical Technique-. edited by Hyakusoku H. Chugai Igakusya, Tokyo, pp22-26, 2011.

2. Ogawa R. Merits and Demerits of So-called Wrapping Method. Atlas -Plastic Surgical Technique-. edited by Hyakusoku H. Chugai Igakusya, Tokyo, pp27-30, 2011.

3. Ogawa R. Wound Management to Make Unnoticeable Wounds. Atlas -Plastic Surgical Technique-. edited by Hyakusoku H. Chugai Igakusya, Tokyo, pp31-36, 2011.

4. Ogawa R, Mitsuhashi K. Surgical and Non-Surgical Therapies for Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars. Atlas -Plastic Surgical Technique-. edited by Hyakusoku H. Chugai Igakusya, Tokyo, pp163-167, 2011.

5. Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R. Piercing and Its Associated Troubles. Atlas -Plastic Surgical Technique-. edited by Hyakusoku H. Chugai Igakusya, Tokyo, pp172-175, 2011.

 

Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Wound Dressing-from Plastic Surgeon's Standpoint. Gijyutujyouhoukyoukai, Tokyo, pp142-147, 2012.

 

Ogawa R. The Most Current Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars. Additional Volume: Igaku No Ayumi. The Forefront of Wound Healing. pp123-128, 2012.

 

1. Ogawa R. Wound Classification and General Principles of Wound Healing. “Atlas – Methods for Scarless Wound Healing” 2nd Edition, Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp1-11, 2012 (Japanese).
2. Ogawa R. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (VAC Therapy) –Mechanisms and Practice.- “Atlas – Methods for Scarless Wound Healing” 2nd Edition, Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp22-25, 2012 (Japanese).
3. Ogawa R. Advantage and Disadvantage of Food Rap Therapy. “Atlas – Methods for Scarless Wound Healing” 2nd Edition, Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp99-101, 2012 (Japanese).
4. Ogawa R, Hyakusoku H. Scar and Scar Contracture –From Aesthetic and Functional Outcomes-. “Atlas – Methods for Scarless Wound Healing” 2nd Edition, Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp133-142, 2012 (Japanese).
5. Ogawa R, Akaishi S. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars –What is Red and Elevated Scars-. “Atlas – Methods for Scarless Wound Healing” 2nd Edition, Edited by Hyakusoku H, Ogawa R, Zen-Nipponbyoin Shuppan Kai, Tokyo, pp145-156, 2012 (Japanese).

 

1. Ogawa R. Mechanisms of Development of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars. “Total Wound Management", Edited by Ichioka S, Kokuseido Shuppan, Tokyo, pp344-346, 2012 (Japanese).

2. Ogawa R. Surgical Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars. “Total Wound Management", Edited by Ichioka S, Kokuseido Shuppan, Tokyo, pp350-352, 2012 (Japanese).

 

Ogawa R. Mechanisms of Development of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars Cuased by Suture Materials. Ideal Design and Development of Implants. Gijyutujyouhoukyoukai, Tokyo, pp225-228, 2013.

 

■Web Publications

【English Publications】

Ogawa R. The Latest in Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar Pathophysiology and Treatment Strategies: Keloids Can Be Treated by Employing Up-to-Date Surgical Management. Plastic Surgery Pulse News 5: Quality Medical Publishing, Inc. St Louis, 2013.